Essential Knife Skills
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#21 (permalink)      6/30/2015 10:20:29 AM US Central   quote/reply + tips
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JpKrHk
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Japanese whetstone
#22 (permalink)      6/30/2015 10:22:31 AM US Central   quote/reply + tips
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DefMunky
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I won't post any links here since it would be to outside sources, but Lansky and Smith's both make good guided sharpening systems that don't cost a week or month's pay. The little 3 stone kits they sell would work just fine and they have more expensive, more inclusive sets as well of course. There is a very small learning curve but the stones are on rods so it ain't much. lol

A Lansky kit:


Smith's version:


They're essentially the same damn thing. lol Diamond stones will be easier to clean and typically cut faster than natural stones. Natural stones might actually be longer wearing than cheap diamond plates though, as the plates can shed diamonds during use.

If you want to learn how to free hand Smiths makes a nice three sided whetstone. Of course the learning curve is steeper, but your options increase exponentially.

Whetstones:


Diamond Plates:


Also, unless you're wanting mirror polished edges, 600 grit is fine for finishing the edge of a normal daily use knife. If you have something more collectible or like mirror edges then you'll need to go up to 1k or higher, but that totally isn't needed for a shaving sharp usable edge.

Just use Google to find the best prices as these are two of the biggest manufacturers of this type of stuff and will NOT be hard to find. lol If you live in the states and have a sporting goods or hardware store nearby I can almost guarantee you they will have one or the other company's sets. Where I live Lowe's has the Smith's, Academy Sports has the Lansky stuff.
#23 (permalink)      6/30/2015 10:27:11 AM US Central   quote/reply + tips
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DefMunky
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JpKrHk wrote:

Japanese whetstone



Yeah... you gotta learn to walk before you can run. :p

But nothing will put an edge and polish on something like a Japanese waterstone, and I haven't seen any other stones with such stupidly high grits. I dunno that I have seen any other stones so potentially expensive either. lol

#24 (permalink)      6/30/2015 10:42:43 AM US Central   quote/reply + tips
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#25 (permalink)      6/30/2015 10:51:56 AM US Central   quote/reply + tips
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bdpf79
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Thanks DefMunky for the very useful info!
The 2 that you linked are most definitely within my price range. Can they be used to sharpen bigger knives as well?
Tonight when I'll get home, I'll just need to do a bit of research on both and see a few youtube videos to see which one is the simplest to use.
BTW, any good sharpening for beginner videos that you can recommend?
When googling for best pocket knife sharpening tool, one that seems to come up quite often is the Spyderco one which is a bit more expensive. Any thoughts on that one?
#26 (permalink)      6/30/2015 11:00:52 AM US Central   quote/reply + tips
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JpKrHk, I'll have a look at the Jap waterstone as well but it looks like it might require more skill.
It looks like some might be reasonably prices at $50/$60, not sure if they're any good though.
#27 (permalink)      6/30/2015 11:08:56 AM US Central   quote/reply + tips
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Depends on the kitchen knife and the technique. If the stone can reach the tip it should be able to sharpen it. I would recommend learning to hand sharpen your big kitchen knives like a 8" chef's. Even though they can reach the angle can change quite a bit. Big knives are actually easier to hand sharpen then smaller knives as they are more stable on the stone.

The Spyderco is a good set and it gives you options. If you want to see the inspiration for the design, look up Lansky croc sticks. ;) It can be converted to a bench type stone as well. It would be good for both large and small blades, but it isn't as guided as the other two so the learning curve will be a little higher. Not much mind you, just keep the blade at 90 degrees and watch the tip so you don't round it off, but it does take some practice.

I'm not too sure of where to point you for sharpening vids with the Lansky, Smith's, or Spyderco. Richard Blaine actually has a great set of vids on freehand sharpening, stropping, and steeling knives. I don't usually watch these kinds of vids, but he gives good information. WAY better than freaking Gordon Ramsay. lol He obviously does not sharpen his own knives at all.
#28 (permalink)      6/30/2015 11:18:05 AM US Central   quote/reply + tips
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DefMunky
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bdpf79 wrote:

JpKrHk, I'll have a look at the Jap waterstone as well but it looks like it might require more skill.
It looks like some might be reasonably prices at $50/$60, not sure if they're any good though.



Be careful. Some cheaper stones are as soft as clay and will need constant flattening. More expensive stones tend to last longer but still need to be flattened (some are still very soft by design). The ones I like are Shapton Professional stones. There are also Shapton Glass stones which are also nice but a little harder and don't give as much feedback.

If you look on the Bay the Japanese version of the Shapton Professionals (same stones, Japanese packaging with no english) run about $40 to $60 each. You'd at least want a 320 (blade repair) and a 1k (normal sharpening), which will run you about $80. If you get the American market version it will run about $100 for the pair. I'm not sure of the Shapton Glass prices on the Bay though.

You could also get a 30k grit for about $350 or more... for ONE stone... lol

And Japanese carbon steel (Shirogami/White #1) is probably one of the only blade steels that can take a refinement that high. lol

#29 (permalink)      6/30/2015 11:20:13 AM US Central   quote/reply + tips
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Now at least, I have somewhere to start looking at ;)
Thanks a lot.
#30 (permalink)      6/30/2015 11:26:25 AM US Central   quote/reply + tips
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bdpf79 wrote:

Now at least, I have somewhere to start looking at ;)
Thanks a lot.



No problem. :)

Just remember:

Lansky/Smiths = Total sharpening noob, easiest to use. Easily expandable.

Spyderco = Intermediate. Not hard but does require you to pay more attention. TONS of options.

Japanese Waterstones = Advanced... if you make a mistake you can damage the stone AND the knife. You'll never get a sharper edge though.

Pull Through sharpeners/rolling sharpeners = NO! NEVER! ABSOLUTELY NOT! I WILL HUNT YOU DOWN!


:p lol

#31 (permalink)      6/30/2015 11:26:24 AM US Central   quote/reply + tips
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bdpf79 wrote:

JpKrHk, I'll have a look at the Jap waterstone as well


I just wanted to bring attention to the word "pierre à aiguiser", so it is italicized.

Probably a bad translation on my part, as usual i would say.