The most essential knife skills are sharpening and maintaining the knife. If one can't do that it becomes a flat bar of steel...

I've been playing with knives since I was about 10~12 years old, so for close to 30 years. I've been sharpening them for that long too. lol

Richard Blaine has some good videos on how to sharpen your knives and how to keep them sharp. He deals with cooking knives, but everything in his vids carries over to other types of knives as well.

This is like an introductory video, but his channel has quite a few others on different sharpening related subjects.


He also has other vids on sharpening with Japanese water stones as well, so whether you want to use diamond stones, Arkansas whetstones, or Japanese waterstones, Mr. Blaine has vids for all of it.

One thing I want to warn anyone that might watch YouTube videos to learn how to sharpen knives, don't watch any videos where a chef is trying to show how to sharpen a knife. I have never seen a good sharpening video made by a chef. Maybe the only exception is occasionally a Japanese chef, but some of those are still not good.

Also I can't help but point out, the guy in the GIFs JP posted needs to sharpen his Misono... he is seriously disrespecting that knife. The other one looks acceptable. lol :p

Here is a pic of my 165mm Yamashin santoku after I sharpened it:


Handmade Japanese knives will often come with a dull or basic edge so the user can put their own edge on the knife. This Yamashin was a knife like that.

And just a little knife porn...

A handmade (I don't think the blade was hand hammered though) Goko Sandvic 19C27 stainless Damascus 240mm Gyuto (top) and a Tojiro DP 210mm gyuto (Japanese factory produced):


A Yamashin 165mm santoku and 140mm (I think) Ko Bocho next to a Forschner's 8" chef's knife by Victorinox:


And I don't have a pic of my pride and joy, so here's a pic from the place where I bought it. It is a Goko 240mm gyuto with a stainless clad White #1 carbon steel core:


If you tried the avocado pit removal with this knife, you'd risk chipping the blade or outright splitting the pit and putting the blade into your hand. These things get scary sharp and the blade on this one is relatively heavy compared to the others. lol