Knife sharpeners???
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#21 (permalink)      8/12/2015 10:21:27 AM US Central   quote/reply + tips
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DefMunky
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Steve was thinking of another model 42 knife is all.
#22 (permalink)      8/12/2015 11:20:42 AM US Central   quote/reply + tips
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pickles
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This is gonna be a long post.

Get some quality stones and forget about the guided systems, jigs, etc. Get a few cheapo knives and practice your freehand technique and it won't be long before you are getting hair popping sharp blades. Once you get a feel for it you'll never forget, just like riding a bicycle.

One day many years ago I got really tired of trying to cut things with dull knives. Every knife in the house was useless, so I went out and bought one of those Lansky things. It worked well enough to get things sharp, but it was a big pain in the dick. I hated the clamps and rods and all that, and if I removed the blade and put it back in, or if it accidently shifted, the angle was slightly different and I was basically grinding a whole new bevel every time I sharpened. In order to avoid this everything needed to be set up exactly the same every time, something I found to be almost impossible. That, combined with the fact that the whole thing was a big bulky system with multiple parts, made me go out and get some proper stones.

With stones and a bit of technique (really just holding my hand steady)I can quickly touch up an edge, or completely reset a bevel, at any angle, no matter the length of the blade. This is because I'm not restricted to this angle or that angle like I would be with a guided system. I don't need to completely regrind an edge because I can match the edge perfectly, no matter what the current angle happens to be.

People worry too much about the exact angle, which isn't as important as keeping the same angle as you sharpen. A simple way to find the correct angle (assuming you want to keep the angle the edge is currently set at) is to practice on a piece of wood. Lay the blade flat on a flat block of wood and pull (or push), edge leading, while slowly rocking the blade toward the edge. When the edge catches the wood, you've found the correct angle. Practice keeping a steady hand and move from your shoulders. Muscle memory will allow you to transfer that angle to the stones.

I mostly use DMT diamond stones. They are expensive but very high quality, and they will last many years. They cut fast and they cut everything. After the diamonds I go to a super fine white ceramic stone, then strop on leather loaded with green compound, then on bare leather.

TLDR: Jigs are like training wheels, and they won't help you develop proper technique. Learn freehand sharpening and you'll be able to sharpen anything, anywhere. If you understand how to sharpen freehand you can sharpen your knife in the middle of the woods, on a rock. You won't be dependent of fancy contraptions and you won't need to send your knife half way across the world to have the factory put a sub-par edge on your knife once it gets dull. Eventually you'll enjoy sharpening. I find it very relaxing, almost meditative.
#23 (permalink)      8/12/2015 11:48:04 AM US Central   quote/reply + tips
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Nymzavril
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My issue is that I have so many knives (about 200 at last count) plus kitchen knives, that it's hard to develop a feel for such a wide range of thicknesses and lengths. Plus different knives for different tasks need different grinds. I find that the Lansky takes away some of the guesswork. I can sharpen my Fairbain Applegate, Gerber LMF, and Kershaw Needs Work with my eyes closed using a cinder block, because those are the ones I carry most often. For others though, the guides help.

That said, the built in sharpener on the LMF is remarkably good for a quick buff up in the field. Most pocket sharpeners are junk, and ones integrated into the sheath are even worse; but Gerber got it right with the LMF.
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#24 (permalink)      8/12/2015 12:00:53 PM US Central   quote/reply + tips
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Nymzavril
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It should be said that the issue I highlighted regarding the potential for creating a differential grind, need not be negative as long as you're making it work for you. By positioning the clamp in a certain way, you can differ the profile at the forte and foible with a smooth transition in-between, depending on what work you're doing. I have knives that have a sharper piercing tip, and others where the tip is more robust, whilst the forte is sharper for finer work such as whittling.

The only consistent feature of clamped systems, is that it tends to give you a secondary grind rather than an appleseed profile.
Grand Poobah of The Sacred Order of The Magick Blue Screwdriver. The old Juice Junkies FAQ and guides can be found here: https://www.dropbox.com/sh/vp4ktp8l7fdywg5/AABFkmnUJhjl9vX8tE4URZ8sa?dl=0
#25 (permalink)      8/12/2015 12:35:53 PM US Central   quote/reply + tips
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pickles
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Nymzavril wrote:

Plus different knives for different tasks need different grinds



Which is why freehand is the best overall sharpening system. With the wood trick I can find any angle and match it, or I can adjust my angle to get any grind I want. With the Lansky you are limited to 4 angles. If you have a blade that needs just a light touchup but the angle of the blade is somewhere in between the angles provided by the Lansky, then you are forced to completely regrind the edge to one of the Lansky angles. That's a whole lot of work and a waste of steel. Then when you sharpen that same knife again, unless you get it clamped exactly the same as last time, you'll need to re-grind again.

#26 (permalink)      8/12/2015 12:54:36 PM US Central   quote/reply + tips
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DefMunky
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Freehand is the best for those willing to learn how to sharpen freehand. I first started when I was about 12 so it's pretty much all I do, but some people have a knife or two that they like and can't be assed to learn how to properly hand sharpen those knives. It is also for those that use knives for some specific purpose, which is why these sets like to hang out by the hunting and fishing area. While I'd never let a knife intended to skin anything touch a Lansky, a lot of hunters I know lay out their stuff at the start of the season and might as well be sharpening lawnmower blades for all they care. The same people carry pocket sharpeners and like pull through sharpeners as well... those are the biggest crime ever committed against cutlery... lol

It also seems that those who like to freehand and find it therapeutic are the ones that love their knives. If there is no love for the knife, there is no desire to "waste" the time needed to learn to sharpen it freehand. Just a theory though, mainly because I love my knives... which fortunately my wife accepts even if she may not understand. lol
#27 (permalink)      8/12/2015 1:15:23 PM US Central   quote/reply + tips
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pickles
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Those pull through carbide "sharpeners" are horrible, like you say a crime against cutlery, "Scraaaaaaaaaaape", and then a horrible wavy, chewed up edge. Also people ruining their knives on bench grinders and such.

You are definitely right about people and their love for their tools. I only buy (or make) the best quality tools and treat them all with respect. I hadn't even considered that when I made my first post; I forgot that most people don't really care and consider everything, even their knives, as disposable and easily replaced.
#28 (permalink)      8/13/2015 2:58:47 AM US Central   quote/reply + tips
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8steve88
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DefMunky wrote:

Benchmade 42Edit: I guess you saw that then. lol



Thought you meant the BokerPlus Nano 42. LOL. I really should read all the thread properly before replying.
The Lansky rod and hone system will sharpen a Nano but not the Benchmade 42.
Sorry, I guess our posts crossed, I'm a slow typist.